Health Technology Assessment Training Program

The ISPOR HTA Training Program is a 1–3½ day modular program intended for “users and doers” in government, such as Ministries of Health and health insurance funds, evolving and established HTA agencies or other government departments responsible for healthcare decision making. It is also designed for public and private payers, industry, health plans, academia, and patient group representatives, interested in learning how to conduct various aspects of HTA with an emphasis on clinical and economic evaluation. The program is also intended to aid decision makers in understanding how to interpret data presented to them, as well as what a good HTA process requires and how this can be tailored to different settings.

Upcoming HTA Training Programs

Look for upcoming HTA Training Programs to be announced in the near future.

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Additional Program Information

Learning Objectives

By the end of the program, participants will be able to:
  • Describe what a 'good' HTA process looks like and why this is important for health policy decisions
  • Understand what evidence is; how the individual need for evidence may differ among patients, providers, payers, and regulators; and how to identify and combine clinical research (ie, meta-analysis and modeling)
  • Recognize best practices in the conduct and reporting of economic evaluation, and be able to conduct a trial- and modeling-based economic evaluation
  • Be aware of other important factors in policy decision making (eg, societal value, patient perspectives, and ethical, legal, social and cultural implications of technology use, etc) and understand how these can be incorporated into an HTA process
  • Appreciate different issues, as well as the importance of different perspectives, related to the use and conduct of HTA



 

Program Content Outline

  1. Introduction to HTA
    1. What is Health Technology Assessment and why is it important?
      • Describe what ‘health technology’, ‘health technology assessment’ is and key definitions linked with this process
      • Describe role of HTA in health care system; assessment process, appraisal process, and decision-making process
      • Why HTA is important for health policy, the public and patients
      • Other key terminology in HTA
    2. What are best practices in HTA?
      • Outline the fundamentals of what a ‘good’ HTA process looks like
      • Identify principles applicable to structuring and governing HTA organizations
      • How patients and other stakeholders can interact with an HTA process
      • Key aspects of HTA: Clinical evidence, economic evaluation, budget impact and uncertainty
      • Evidence Interpretation and Appraisal – Importance of process and societal and stakeholder involvement
    3. Current and future issues in HTA
      • Different and evolving approaches to implement HTA
      • Impact of HTA and barriers to impact
      • Upstream / Constructive HTA
      • Personalized medicine
      • Patient and citizen involvement
      • Transparency of process, confidentiality and conflict of interest
      • Data transparency, sharing and collaboration between HTA bodies and industry
    4. Implementing HTA
      • Formulary and benefits packages/ tiering
      • Managed entry agreements: risk-sharing/ performance-based, coverage with evidence development agreements
      • Supporting disinvestment decisions
      • Pricing and value-based pricing
      • Evidence-based / strategic procurement
    5. Local considerations for HTA
      • Results of course participant survey
      • Reflections on current and future use of HTA
      • Flexible content to fit to the context of the course e.g. a roundtable with regional stakeholders
    6. Framing and Scoping in HTA
      • Differences between policy questions and HTA questions and how they are linked
      • Depth of analysis needed in HTA (e.g., rapid , mini, or full HTA)
      • What sources of information that can be used to answer questions (such as collecting new data or using existing data), the strengths and limitations of each approach
      • Exercise: creating a question
      • Feasibility of evidence collection and potential risk to payers from decisions based on different types of evidence
  2. Conduct of HTA
    1. Developing protocols for primary evidence collection
      • Defining the need for primary evidence collection
      • What type of information contributes to a better understanding of clinical outcome (e.g., observational vs. experimental; quasi-experimental)
      • Differences in clinical information requirements for patients, payers, and regulators
      • Strengths and limitations of different study designs for clinical, economic, and psycho-social (including HRQL) impact of technology
    2. Literature searching: How to identify clinical/economic evidence from secondary sources
      • Various secondary information sources available and how these can be identified through searching databases and other sources
      • Strengths and limitations of using secondary sources of information (i.e., generalizability, dissemination bias)
      • General search methods common across all health technology assessments
      • Exercise: Searching PubMeb and NHS CRD
    3. Combining and interpreting clinical evidence
      • Differences between efficacy and effectiveness
      • How to use and interpret observational (i.e., real-world evidence), modeling studies and meta-analysis (including indirect treatment comparison)
      • How to interpret patient reported outcome measures including health-related quality of life instruments
      • How clinical data can be combined with data on health-related quality of life
      • Exercise: Using the ISPOR Assessing Observational/Modeling Studies for Health Care Decisions Task Force Report
    4. Costing and economic evaluation
      • Introduction to economic evaluation
      • Best practices in conducting and reporting economic evaluation
      • Best practices and issues related to study- based economic evaluation
      • Best practices and issues related to model- based economic evaluation
      • Exercises: Appraising economic studies; Conducting and transferring economic evaluation
    5. Budget Impact Analysis
      • Differences between a budget impact analysis and economic evaluation
      • How to conduct budget impact analysis
      • How economic evaluation and budget impact analysis can be used to address policymaker uncertainty
      • Exercise: Implementing economic evaluation
    6. Combining ethical, legal, social, cultural and other forms of evidence in HTA
      • Best practices in conducting and reporting research on ethical, legal, social and cultural impacts of technology
      • How do these forms of evidence overlap with clinical and economic evidence and evidence from patients?
    7. Evidence Appraisal – Methods for integrating societal and stakeholder values
      • Principles of combining social value including patient perspectives into an appraisal of evidence
      • Role and use of multi-criteria decision analysis and other approaches for combining perspectives
      • Best practices in patient engagement
      • Best practices in deliberative methods (processes)

 

 



 

Background

The ISPOR Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Training Program was developed by the Society's Health Technology Assessment Council which consists of the chairs of its Health Technology Assessment Roundtable in Europe and North America, HTAnetAsia, and HTAnetLatAm. The ISPOR HTA Training Program became a priority for the council based on input from members and regional groups for support in knowledge building.

Since ISPOR launched regional HTA Roundtables, each regional group has recognized and documented the need for capacity building in HTA (globally and through the regions). Each HTA Roundtable has reported that opportunity exists for ISPOR to assume a leadership role in capacity building and training around the world and those credible, comprehensive, and flexible programs would be highly desirable. Summaries of relevant regional discussions are below:

  • 2008 – First Asia Pacific Roundtable Recommendation:Provide administration for the Council to collect training materials, recommend training instructors, and develop training activities in Asian countries

  • 2009 – First Latin America Roundtable Recommendation:Need for training & formation of high level people

  • 2012 – 16th HTA Roundtable Europe Recommendation: Capacity building for using/understanding outcomes research information in HTA (with view to the societal perspective), patient experts, researchers, decision makers through courses, workshops, media communications, and education programs

Recognizing capacity building needs were universal across all ISPOR regions, the ISPOR HTA Council in 2013 began to discuss how ISPOR could respond to similar but unique needs in each part of the world. Council meetings enabled shared understanding of global and regional HTA capacity building needs and considered a number of approaches which would eliminate the potential for redundancy of effort and investment in HTA training. Following intensive discussion, the HTA Council, over the course of several meetings, recommended that all ISPOR HTA capacity building efforts be aligned through the development of a comprehensive and highly credible ISPOR-branded training program.

The group envisioned the workshop/training to be adaptable to regional needs in Asia, Latin America, Central & Eastern Europe, and Africa, as well as in Western Europe and North America.

An HTA Council led Task Force was developed to ensure the development of the ISPOR HTA Training Program materials. Materials were reviewed by members of the HTA Council, HTA Roundtables, the ISPOR Board of Directors, the Institutional Council, as well as Regional experts (in Asia-Pacific, Latin America, and Central and Eastern Europe). The extensive peer review ensures the credibility of the material, as well as adaptability to various target audiences and regions.

The ISPOR HTA Training Program held its pilot in Zagreb, Croatia and took place over 3 ½ days from June 20, 2015 to June 23, 2015. It included 27 participants from 13 Central and Eastern European countries.



 

Previous Trainings

Previous ISPOR HTA Trainings include:

HTA Training—Lima, Peru
23-26 July 2018

HTA Training—Princeton, NJ, USA
June 19-21, 2018

HTA Training—Copenhagen Öresund Region
6-9 June 2017

HTA Training—Bogotá, Colombia
20-23 February 2017

HTA Training—Lisbon, Portugal 
26-29 June 2016 

HTA Training—Astana, Kazakhstan 
22-24 September 2015

HTA Training—Zagreb, Croatia 
20-23 June 2015

 

 

The ISPOR Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Training Program was developed by the Society's Health Technology Assessment Council which consists of the chairs of its Health Technology Assessment Roundtable in Europe and North America, HTAnetAsia, and HTAnetLatAm. The ISPOR HTA Training Program became a priority for the council based on input from members and regional groups for support in knowledge building.

Since ISPOR launched regional HTA Roundtables, each regional group has recognized and documented the need for capacity building in HTA (globally and through the regions). Each HTA Roundtable has reported that opportunity exists for ISPOR to assume a leadership role in capacity building and training around the world and those credible, comprehensive, and flexible programs would be highly desirable. Summaries of relevant regional discussions are below:

  • 2008 – First Asia Pacific Roundtable Recommendation:Provide administration for the Council to collect training materials, recommend training instructors, and develop training activities in Asian countries

  • 2009 – First Latin America Roundtable Recommendation:Need for training & formation of high level people

  • 2012 – 16th HTA Roundtable Europe Recommendation: Capacity building for using/understanding outcomes research information in HTA (with view to the societal perspective), patient experts, researchers, decision makers through courses, workshops, media communications, and education programs

Recognizing capacity building needs were universal across all ISPOR regions, the ISPOR HTA Council in 2013 began to discuss how ISPOR could respond to similar but unique needs in each part of the world. Council meetings enabled shared understanding of global and regional HTA capacity building needs and considered a number of approaches which would eliminate the potential for redundancy of effort and investment in HTA training. Following intensive discussion, the HTA Council, over the course of several meetings, recommended that all ISPOR HTA capacity building efforts be aligned through the development of a comprehensive and highly credible ISPOR-branded training program.

The group envisioned the workshop/training to be adaptable to regional needs in Asia, Latin America, Central & Eastern Europe, and Africa, as well as in Western Europe and North America.

An HTA Council led Task Force was developed to ensure the development of the ISPOR HTA Training Program materials. Materials were reviewed by members of the HTA Council, HTA Roundtables, the ISPOR Board of Directors, the Institutional Council, as well as Regional experts (in Asia-Pacific, Latin America, and Central and Eastern Europe). The extensive peer review ensures the credibility of the material, as well as adaptability to various target audiences and regions.

The ISPOR HTA Training Program held its pilot in Zagreb, Croatia and took place over 3 ½ days from June 20, 2015 to June 23, 2015. It included 27 participants from 13 Central and Eastern European countries.



 

 

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"An inspiring Health Technology Assessment training. The ISPOR HTA Council offered tremendous insights into Health Technology Assessment. I found the program inspiring" -
Assoc. Prof. Tomas Tesar, PhamDr., PhD., MBA - Slovakia

"Very fruitful, perfect delivery. I received a lot of knowledge regarding implementation of HTA. One of the most successful workshops/training I've ever attended"-
Anonymous comment from pilot program evaluation

"In my opinion this is very useful and just in time project which will help our countries to produce more experts. I think that this format of gathering delegates from different countries will help us learn from each other, interchange ideas and share experiences" -
Anonymous comments from pilot program evaluation

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